Tokelau

 

Originally settled by Polynesian emigrants from surrounding island groups, the Tokelau Islands were made a British protectorate in 1889. They were transferred to New Zealand administration in 1925.

 

Geography:
Location: Oceania, group of three atolls in the South Pacific Ocean, about one-half of the way from Hawaii to New Zealand
Geographic coordinates: 9 00 S, 172 00 W
People:
Population: 1,368 (July 2012 est.)
Age structure: 0-14 years: 42%

15-64 years: 53%

65 years and over: 5% (2009 est.)

Government:
Country name: conventional long form: none

conventional short form: Tokelau

Dependency status: self-administering territory of New Zealand; note – Tokelau and New Zealand have agreed to a draft constitution as Tokelau moves toward free association with New Zealand; a UN sponsored referendum on self-governance in October 2007 did not produce the two-thirds majority vote necessary for changing the political status
Communications:
Telephones – main lines in use: 300 (2009)
Telephone system: general assessment: modern satellite-based communications system

domestic: radiotelephone service between islands

international: country code – 690; radiotelephone service to Samoa; government-regulated telephone service (TeleTok); satellite earth stations – 3

Transportation:
none; offshore anchorage only
Military:
Defence is the responsibility of New Zealand

Economy:

Tokelau’s small size (three villages), isolation, and lack of resources greatly restrain economic development and confine agriculture to the subsistence level. The people rely heavily on aid from New Zealand – about $4 million annually – to maintain public services with annual aid being substantially greater than GDP. The principal sources of revenue come from sales of copra, postage stamps, souvenir coins, and handicrafts. Money is also remitted to families from relatives in New Zealand.

Transnational Issues:Tokelau included American Samoa’s Swains Island (Olohega) in its 2006 draft constitution.